Southern Comfort Services

Providing quality services to the community in which we live.

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Frequently Asked Questions

To ask a question not listed below, please submit your question on the contact us page.

Why do I need a real estate inspection?

Do I need to have a house I am having built or a newly constructed home inspected?

Why can’t I do the real estate inspection myself?

How long does an inspection take?

Should I be there for the inspection?

What will my home inspection cost?

Is the real estate inspection guaranteed?

Why did the inspector not include everything wrong with the property being inspected?

What is the difference between a real estate home inspection and an appraisal?

 

Q. Why do I need a real estate Inspection?

A. Buying a home could be one of the largest investments you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you will want to learn as much as you can about the house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.

If you already are a homeowner, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and suggest preventative measures that might help you avoid costly future repairs.

If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

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Q. Do I need to have a house I am having built or a newly constructed home inspected?

A. It is not good business to forego a home inspection on a newly constructed house, regardless of how conscientious and reputable your home builder.

No home, regardless of how well it is constructed, is totally free of defects. No general contractor can possibly oversee every element of the building process, and the very nature of human imperfection dictates that some mistakes and oversights will occur, even when the most talented and best-intentioned craftsmen are involved.

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Q. Why can’t I do the real estate inspection myself?

A. Even the most experienced home owner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector who has inspected hundreds, perhaps thousands of homes in his or her career. The inspectors at Southern Comfort Services are familiar with the many elements of home construction, their proper installation, and maintenance. He understands how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as how and why they fail.

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Q. How long does an inspection take?

A. Inspection time will vary according to the size, age, and complexity of the structure and whether or not it is occupied. As a general rule, a thorough and professional inspection of an average sized, occupied home should take 2 to 3 hours.

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Q. Should I be there for the inspection?

A. It is not necessary for you to be present for the inspection, but it is a good idea. Contrary to what one might imagine, it is not typically a good idea to follow the inspector through the inspection and asking questions. This may distract your inspector while performing the inspection itself and distract them from noticing a malfunction or defect of importance. It would be best, however, to be available at the end of the inspection for the inspector to review the report with you verbally and answer any questions you may have at that time. Being available at the end of the inspection should allow you the opportunity to learn more about the property being inspected and get some tips on general maintenance.

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Q. What will my home inspection cost?

 A. Inspection fees for a typical single family home vary by geography, size, and features of the property, and age of the home. Additionally, services for external buildings such as guest houses, work sheds, barns, etc. will add additional cost. Prices vary.

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Q. Is the real estate inspection guaranteed?

A. A real estate inspection is not protection against future failures. Stuff happens! Components like heating and air conditioning systems can break down. A home inspection tells you the condition of the component/structure at the time of the inspection. For protection from future failure you may want to consider a home warranty.

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Q. Why did the inspector not include everything wrong with the property being inspected?

A. Real estate inspectors are only able to inspect the visible conditions of the property, at the time of the inspection. The inspector is not able to open structural or mechanical components to assess the condition of items not easily visible. For example, you would not want to purchase the property where an inspector removes all of the sheetrock in the home so they could inspect the inner wall structures or have an inspector walk all over the roof of the home, thereby damaging the roof.

In addition, your inspector may not include some items on the report that are not considered significant. Typically, these items are cosmetic defects that will not affect the performance of the mechanical or structural component.

Inspectors in the state of Texas are required by the State of Texas to follow the Standards of Practice as established by the Texas Real Estate Commission (TREC).  To view the current Standards of Practice, visit the TREC WEBSITE.

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Q. What is the difference between a real estate home inspection and an appraisal?

A. A real estate inspection is for the buyer whereas the appraisal is for the lenders. Home inspections evaluate the physical condition of structures and mechanical systems on property and identify items that need to be repaired or replaced. An appraisal estimates the market value of the property and to make sure the property is marketable

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